The Benefits Of Having Your Own Snooker Cue

Whilst most people start out playing snooker with the standard communal cues that are used by other players some people decide to invest in their own cue as they improve at the game. This is especially true for those that are competitive players who aspire to – or already do – play in competitions and tournaments. For those that are serious about playing snooker having their own cue holds many benefits.

It is important to bear in mind that whilst you will always have access to communal snooker cues these are cues that many other players are also using. This means that they get worn very quickly, are often not really looked after or maintained, may not be of a particularly high quality, and may not even feel comfortable to you.

There are a number of benefits that come from having your own snooker cue, and for many snooker players their cue is their pride and joy because it forms such an important part of their game. Some of the benefits that come with having your own snooker cue as opposed to using communal ones include:

  • You can choose a cue that feels comfortable for you, which will help to improve your game. The size and weight of the cue can make a big difference to how comfortable you feel when you are holding it and more importantly playing with it, which in turn can impact on how well you play.
  • You can select the appearance of your cue. Snooker cues are usually available in ash wood or maple. When you buy your own you can choose the wood that you want and select the appearance that you find most appealing.
  • You will be able to look after your cue properly to ensure optimum performance and longevity. Communal cues are used by one person after another, get very worn quite quickly, and have nobody to really invest any time in looking after them and keeping them in good condition, which can affect their performance.

Of course, buying your own cue means paying out some money, and if you only play snooker occasionally with friends or you are only just starting out then it is probably best to stick to communal cues and avoid the cost. However, if you are serious about this game, planning to improve and progress, and want to play competitively then having a high quality cue that you feel comfortable with can be very important.

EzineArticle by Paul Bryan